Make your own free website on Tripod.com



Popular Homeschooling Approaches

Charlotte Mason Education and Other Classical Methods

Charlotte Mason

"These principles are limited by the respect due to the personality of children, which must not be encroached upon, whether by fear or love, suggestion or influence, or undue play upon any one natural desire. Therefore we are limited to three educational instruments––the atmosphere of environment, the discipline of habit, and the presentation of living ideas."

Where to Start: Penny Gardner's articles in this newsletter

For More Information:


On the Web:



Books:

  • Charlotte Mason's Original Homeschooling Series
    This is a lengthy collection of Mason's own writings on home education, written in the formal style of 19th century England. While the variety and richness of Mason's ideas are worth the time invested in reading this series, most home educating parents seem to get more benefit from the modern interpretations offered by Susan MacAulay, Karen Andreola, Penny Gardner, and Catherine Levison.
  • For the Children's Sake by Susan S. MacAulay
    "Education is an adventure. It's about people, children, life, reality!" This book was among the first to interpret Charlotte Mason's ideas, and remains a classic with home schooling parents.
  • A Charlotte Mason Companion: Personal Reflections on the Gentle Art of Learning by Karen Andreola
    Karen Andreola was a pioneer in the area of Chrlotte Mason homeschooling. This book describes this style of education, offers a rich variety of home schooling ideas, and shares the author's personal experiences.
  • Charlotte Mason Study Guide by Penny Gardner
    This book can be used as a study guide to Mason's Original Homeschooling Series, or alone, as an articulate introduction to Mason's ideas.
  • A Charlotte Mason Education by Catherine Levison
    A concise overview of Charlotte Mason education methods. This is a good first book for someone wanting an introduction to Mason's ideas.


Other Classical Methods

"Classical education depends on a three-part process of training the mind. The early years of school are spent in absorbing facts, systematically laying the foundations for advanced study. In the middle grades, students learn to think through arguments. In the high school years, they learn to express themselves. This classical pattern is called the trivium." - Susan Wise Bauer


Where to Start: "What is Classical Education?" by Susan Wise Bauer

For More Information:


On the Web:

  • The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home
    Offers an overview of this method of classical education described in the book The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home by Jesse Wise and Susan Wise Bauer. In addition to information on this style of home education and a promotion for the book, the site offers articles on various home education topics, curriculum reviews, recommended reading lists, and active message boards.
  • "The Lost Tools of Learning" by Dorothy Sayers
    A well-known argument for and description of classical education. "The Lost Tools of Learning" was first presented by Miss Sayers at Oxford in 1947.


Books:

  • The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home by Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise
    This is the most popular book on classical home schooling. It offers detailed home education recommendations for every year, grades 1-12. One of its strengths is offering a developmental approach to developing logic and critical thinking skills.

Waldorf Inspired Home Education

"In the first seven years of life, the child seeks to see that the world is a place of goodness, and will learn primarily by imitation and through activity. In the next developmental phase (through puberty) the child most naturally learns through beauty, from adults who merit being authorities. (This is why storytelling and art are employed as teaching vehicles throughout the elementary curriculum.) Finally, entering into the third developmental stage, and ready at last for true independent thinking: the teenager naturally begins a quest for truth" - Kytka Hilmar-Jezek, Ph.D, waldorfhomeschoolers.com.


Where to Start: Waldorf 101 - This is an overview of the process of Waldorf (or Steiner) education.

For More Information:


On the Web:



Books:

Montessori Home Education

"Rather than the outer-directed learning approach where children sit passively for much of the time, receiving mostly verbal information from the teacher--vessels being filled as it were, in a Montessori environment. the child is the leader. It is the teachers job not to lead and lecture, but to observe and follow, sensing when the child is ready to try something new and being ready to present it at as close to the perfect time as possible." - About Maria Montessori & the Montessori Method, preschoolpower.com.


For More Information:


On the Web:



Books:

  • The Absorbent Mind by Maria Montessori
    This is Montessori's last book, containing most of the ideas from her life's work. It is said to be difficult reading.
  • Montessori Play And Learn : A Parent's Guide to Purposeful Play from Two to Six by Lesley Britton
    This book helps parents of young children implement Montessori ideas in their homes.
    Montessori Play and Learn is packed with ideas, activities, and games that can fit into your normal routine and help supplement preschool learning for your child. For planning your home, introducing your child to the supermarket or the neighborhood, and helping him discover other people and cultures, this book provides valuable tips and insights that help parents and children grow and learn together.
    • Create hundreds of learning opportunities from everyday life
    • Learn dozens of games and activities to help prepare children for mathematics, reading, science, and writing
    • Make your home environment as stimulating for your child as the best Montessori preschool."

Unschooling (a term coined by educator and writer John Holt, to describe what is sometimes called "Child Led Learning")

"Unschooling to me means learning what one wants, when one wants, in the way one wants, where one wants, for one's own reasons. The learning is learner-directed; advisors or facilitators are sought out as desired by the learner. There are no curricula, lesson plans, schedules, or agendas. Most of the learning is quiet, even invisible, as there is not a focus on creating a lot of 'products.'" - Carol Edson, quoted in "On Unschooling" by Mary Griffith.

On the Web:



Books:

  • How Children Learn by John Holt
    This is essentially a journal of Holt's observations of children at various ages and stages of development, and of his reflections while doing this. Holt is an astute, affectionate and respectful observer of children and an articulate advocate for viewing children as "natural learners," rather than forcing them to learn according to an external agenda.
  • Teach Your Own by John Holt
    This book describes how home educating parents can help children grow as social, active learners. This edition includes legal advice, suggestions on cooperating with schools, and tips on facing the common objections to homeschooling.
  • Learning All the Time by John Holt
    This was Holt's last book, and it distills many of his ideas on education. He explores children's natural capacity to learn, and demonsrates that our efforts to "teach" them, if not in tune with their needs, may be not only ineffective but harmful. Holt also offers examples of positive ways to help children learn.
  • The Relaxed Home School: A Family Production by Mary Hood
    This book offers practical advice on implementing unschooling philosophies into your home school, from a distinctly Christian perspective.
  • The Unschooling Handbook : How to Use the Whole World As Your Child's Classroom by Mary Griffith
    The author describes the unschooling philosophy, blending real-life experiences from various home educating parents with practical suggestions.


Growing Together Family Learning Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 3, page 6

Previous Page

Front Page

Next Page